Daily News from Poets & Writers

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Daily News in the Writing Community from Poets & Writers

Gabriel García Márquez Dies at Age 87, Leonard Riggio Sells 3.7 Million Barnes & Noble Shares, and More
Fri, 18 Apr 2014 08:00:00 +0000 -
Staff

Sarabande Books opens new offices in New York City; Gary Shteyngart to decrease blurbing habit; a “poetry fence” in Alexandria, Virginia; and other news.

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Every day Poets & Writers Magazine scans the headlines—from publishing reports to academic announcements to literary dispatches—for all the news that creative writers need to know. Here are today’s stories:

Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez died at his home in Mexico City yesterday; the Columbian novelist was eighty-seven. (New York Times)

Leonard Riggio, chairman of Barnes & Noble, has sold 3.7 million of his personal holdings in the bookseller, leaving him with twenty percent of Barnes & Noble’s common stock. (GalleyCat)

Sarabande Books, a nonprofit publisher based in Louisville, Kentucky, will open offices in New York City on May 1. (Publishers Weekly)

Novelist Gary Shteyngart has announced his intention to end his book-blurbing habit, with a few exceptions. (New Yorker)

Guernica interviews Graywolf publisher Fiona McCrae as the press celebrates its fortieth year.

SheWired considers novelist Carson McCullers as part of an ongoing series devoted to memorable women.

Meanwhile, the New Criterion reacts to the new biography of Marianne Moore and the psychological trauma it exposes, which previous biographies glossed over. 

Throughout National Poetry Month, Renée Adams, a resident of Alexandria, Virginia, continues to post poems on the outside of her fence for the benefit of passers-by, as she has for the past five years. (Washington Post)

Meanwhile, Miami’s monthlong O, Miami poetry festival is emphasizing Spanish-language verse. (Knight Foundation)

Scheduled pub date: 
April 18, 2014 (All day)
Apple Loses Again in E-book Battle, Amazon Offers Buyouts to Warehouse Employees, and More
Thu, 17 Apr 2014 08:00:00 +0000 -
Staff

Novelist Eleanor Catton on writing strategies; why science fiction should be taken seriously; from blog to book; and other news.

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This is all the info relevant to page 1 of the article.

Every day Poets & Writers Magazine scans the headlines—from publishing reports to academic announcements to literary dispatches—for all the news that creative writers need to know. Here are today’s stories:

On Tuesday, Apple lost yet another decision in the ongoing e-book price-fixing case, when federal judge Denise Cote dismissed a motion filed by the company last November which contended that the states did not have the power to collectively sue for damages. (Publishers Weekly)

Meanwhile, Amazon is offering warehouse employees who have been with the company for less than a year a rather underwhelming cash buyout of $2,000 each. (Melville House)

Novelist Eleanor Catton explains how note taking helped her to pen The Luminaries, the 834-page tome that earned her the Man Booker Prize. (Guardian)

NPR examines the specter of ghostwriting.

Fiction writer Jason K. Friedman investigates the online traces of his novel that was never published. (New York Times)

The Atlantic looks at the often underrated genre of science fiction.

Meanwhile, Cosmopolitan is looking for a fiction writer to contribute to its Bedroom Blog, a fictional sex and dating blog on the magazine's website, for one year.

Novelist Daniel Alarcón is one of several authors who will appear in Austin this Saturday at New Fiction Confab, a one-day event sponsored by donors of the city’s public libraries. (CultureMap Austin)

Electric Literature interviews author Paul Laudiero about the process of turning his blog, Shit Rough Drafts, into a book of the same name, which was released Tuesday by Chronicle Books.

Scheduled pub date: 
April 17, 2014 (All day)
Elmore Leonard’s Detroit, Lee Boudreaux Joins Little, Brown, and More
Wed, 16 Apr 2014 08:00:00 +0000 -
Staff

Green Apple Books saves a San Francisco video store; revisiting the Salman Rushdie fatwa; modeling small businesses after independent booksellers; and other news.

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This is all the info relevant to page 1 of the article.

Every day Poets & Writers Magazine scans the headlines—from publishing reports to academic announcements to literary dispatches—for all the news that creative writers need to know. Here are today’s stories:

Lee Boudreaux, the current editorial director of the HarperCollins imprint Ecco, will launch her eponymous imprint with Little, Brown on September 2. (Publishers Weekly)

In the first installment of a weeklong series focused on Detroit, Grantland takes a look at the sound and the style of the city through the eyes of novelist Elmore Leonard.

In the process of opening a second location, San Francisco’s Green Apple Books, named Bookstore of the Year by Publishers Weekly, has also saved a thirty-four-year-old local video store. (San Francisco Chronicle)

The Guardian recaps a recent Vanity Fair article in which British novelist Martin Amis discusses his argument with Prince Charles over the fatwa issued against Salman Rushdie in 1989.

Meanwhile, based on the American Library Association's lists of frequently banned and challenged books in the U.S., BuzzFeed asks readers to test the scandalousness of their reading histories

Author Marcus Burke outlines his shift from a life of basketball to a writing career. (Atlantic)

The Economist’s blog Babbage compares the process of creating paper books to e-book production and explains why e-books have a long way to go.

Flavorwire offers five reasons to model American small business after independent bookstores.

 

Scheduled pub date: 
April 16, 2014 (All day)
The Guinness World Record of Book Signing, New York City Celebrates James Baldwin, and More
Tue, 15 Apr 2014 08:00:00 +0000 -
Staff

An original Wilfred Owen manuscript on display in England; inside the Manhattan offices of the Paris Review; six successful independent bookstores; and other news.

Page 1
This is all the info relevant to page 1 of the article.

Every day Poets & Writers Magazine scans the headlines—from publishing reports to academic announcements to literary dispatches—for all the news that creative writers need to know. Here are today’s stories:

In celebration of the ninetieth anniversary of James Baldwin’s birth, New York Live Arts will host a five-day festival in New York City later this month dedicated the life and work of the influential writer. (New York Times)

Author Ryan Avery will attempt to set a new Guinness World Record by signing five thousand copies of his forthcoming book, Speaker, Leader, Champion, at Colorado State University tomorrow. (Christian Science Monitor)

In the midst of ongoing crisis in the Crimean Peninsula, writer Jacob Mikanowski considers the geographical, political, and poetic histories that distinguish the region. (Millions)

ReedPOP, the organizer of BookExpo America’s BookCon, has responded to protests on Twitter regarding a scheduled panel of children’s authors including Daniel Handler, Jeff Kinney, James Patterson, and Rick Riordan, and has promised to diversify the panel. (Publishers Weekly)

The Ironbridge Gorge Museum in Shropshire, England, is currently displaying an original manuscript of Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est,” a poem describing the author’s experiences in World War I. (BBC)

Following the closure of Rizzoli Bookstore Friday and ongoing discussion of challenges facing bookstore owners in Manhattan, New York Magazine examines the business practices of six successful independent bookstores in New York City. (New Yorker, New York Times)

Paul Barbera’s recent photographs of the Paris Review offices offer a rare look inside the magazine’s headquarters on West 27th Street in New York City.

The Irish Independent celebrates two new small presses in Ireland

Fiction writer Dell Smith explores how film can influence writing and editing. (Beyond the Margins)

Scheduled pub date: 
April 15, 2014 (All day)
Authors Guild Appeals Judgment for Google, Amazon Smartphone Out in June, and More
Mon, 14 Apr 2014 08:00:00 +0000 -
Staff

An Alice Munro short story becomes a film; a novelist gains new perspective on her husband’s disappearance; a new book on Barney Rosset; and other news.

Page 1
This is all the info relevant to page 1 of the article.

Every day Poets & Writers Magazine scans the headlines—from publishing reports to academic announcements to literary dispatches—for all the news that creative writers need to know. Here are today’s stories:

The Authors Guild has appealed the latest decision by the State of New York’s lower court, which found that Google’s Library Project did not harm the interests of authors whose books are scanned for Google Books. (Publishers Weekly)

Amazon will present its new smartphone to the public in June, with the first shipments to go out in September, reports an underwhelmed Dustin Kurtz for Melville House.

NPR’s Linda Holmes examines Alice Munro’s “Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage” in its transition from a short story to a film starring Kristen Wiig. 

Niamh Ní Mhaoileoin examines how the work of biographers has changed in the age of e-mail. (Millions)

Novelist Emily Listfield recounts the story of her husband’s disappearance, and explains how her daughter's college project helped both women to reexamine the past. (New York Times)

Hope Leman surveys Loren Glass’s new book on Barney Rosset, the former owner and publisher of Grove Press. (Medium)

Meanwhile, Abby Haglage interviews Tony Dokoupil about his new memoir, The Last Pirate, which charts his family’s rise and fall in connection with his father’s drug trafficking. (Daily Beast)

Flavorwire continues its celebration of National Poetry Month with a poem of the day by Latasha Diggs.

Scheduled pub date: 
April 14, 2014 (All day)
TED Talks to Become Book Series, Philip Roth's Letter to the Editor, and More
Fri, 11 Apr 2014 08:00:00 +0000 -
Staff

Writers at the Atlantic look at writing and marriage; the effects of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s writing on his personal life; the death of Michael Rockefeller; and other news.

Page 1
This is all the info relevant to page 1 of the article.

Every day Poets & Writers Magazine scans the headlines—from publishing reports to academic announcements to literary dispatches—for all the news that creative writers need to know. Here are today’s stories:

TED Conferences LLC will be publishing twelve books with Simon & Schuster as part of a series called TED Books. The first book in the series will be released in September. (GalleyCat)

Novelist Philip Roth has responded to a recent review of Adam Begley’s new John Updike biography, Updike. Upset with implications that criticism of Roth's work by Updike in 1993 caused Roth to check himself into a psychiatric hospital, Roth penned a letter to the editor of the New York Times.

After attending the annual Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference in Seattle, David W. Brown of the Atlantic unpacks the struggle to make a living in literature. Meanwhile, Brown’s colleague Koa Beck explores how the careers of many women writers may be hindered by the responsibilities of marriage and children. 

Poet Eavan Boland discusses the difficulties of giving space to each aspect of her identity as a female Irish writer. (Nashville Scene)

The Root discusses whether writers of color should write about white characters.

Author Carl Hoffman discusses the 1961 death of twenty-three-year-old Michael Rockefeller, the mystery at the heart of his new book, Savage Harvest. (Christian Science Monitor

The New Republic takes a look at Karl Ove Knausgaard’s autobiographical fiction and at what his writing has cost him in his personal life.

Scheduled pub date: 
April 11, 2014 (All day)

Provided courtesy of:
Poets & Writers, Inc.

Multimedia Items from Poets & Writers

If At First You Don't Succeed...
Thu, 06 Feb 2014 17:49:57 +0000 -

Miranda Beverly-Whittemore is one of three novelists, profiled by Emily Raboteau in "If At First You Don't Succeed" (March/April 2014), who persevered despite the commercial "failure" of early books. From the profile:

read more

How Food Writing Fed My Fiction
Mon, 20 May 2013 14:15:23 +0000 -
Associated Content
Article: 

Join fiction writer, dessert blogger, and baker Aaron Hamburger at Whole Foods Market in New York City as he prepares his delicious limoncello cupcakes and talks about what the art of food writing has taught him about fiction writing. Watch via YouTube.

Junot Díaz Records Audio of His New Book, This Is How You Lose Her
Thu, 02 Aug 2012 04:00:00 +0000 -
Associated Content

Ever wonder how an audio book is created? Watch this exclusive video of Junot Díaz recording the opening lines of his short story collection, This Is How You Lose Her (Riverhead Books, 2012), which is featured in the Page One section of our September/October 2012 issue.

The Bard Behind the Bar
Sun, 01 Jan 2012 18:54:13 +0000 -
Associated Content
Article: 

Join contributor Robert Hershon for a pint at McSorley's Old Ale House, where poet and head bartender Geoffrey Bartholomew has sold more than five thousand copies of his self-published collection, The McSorley's Poems, without the aid of a high-powered marketing department or special advertising and promotions. Watch via YouTube.

The Corner Library
Tue, 01 Nov 2011 14:12:13 +0000 -
Article: 

Poets & Writers Magazine takes a look inside the Corner Library, a tiny book depository serving the community in Brooklyn, New York's Williamsburg neighborhood.

Behind the Scenes at a Poets & Writers Cover Shoot
Fri, 01 Jul 2011 13:15:49 +0000 -

Go behind the scenes at the photo shoot with the literary agents featured on the cover of our July/August issue to see how much time and energy goes into capturing the images published in Poets & Writers Magazine. Join the photographer, the art director, the managing editor, and the editor of the magazine in a SoHo loft as they work toward the perfect cover.

Writing Contest Advice
Sun, 01 May 2011 19:44:51 +0000 -

Watch Stephanie G'Schwind, Camille Rankine, Michael Collier, and Beth Harrison offer their advice for poets and writers interested in submitting their work to writing contests. G'Schwind, director of the Center for Literary Publishing; Collier, director of the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference; Rankine, communications coordinator at Cave Canem Foundation; and Harrison, associate director of the Academy of American Poets, talked with editor Kevin Larimer as part of a roundtable interview published in the May/June 2011 issue of Poets & Writers Magazine.

The Future of Family-Friendly Residencies
Tue, 01 Mar 2011 14:28:07 +0000 -

Watch contributor Thomas Israel Hopkins—along with this wife, novelist Emily Barton, and their son, Tobias—discuss the impetus for writing "The Future of Family-Friendly Residencies." In the article, which appears in the March/April 2011 issue of Poets & Writers Magazine, Hopkins takes a look at the relatively small number of colonies that allow writers to bring children for their full stay and offers some suggestions for ways in which parent-writers and residency directors can work together to facilitate more programs that accommodate families.

Behind the Design of This Issue's Inspiring Cover
Sat, 01 Jan 2011 05:00:00 +0000 -
Associated Content
Article: 

Watch editor Kevin Larimer's interview with illustrator Jim Tierney, who reveals his initial sketches and revisions of this issue's cover.

DIY: How to Coptic Bind a Chapbook
Mon, 01 Nov 2010 14:18:59 +0000 -
Associated Content

As a companion to Indie Innovators, a special section on groundbreaking presses and magazines, we demonstrate how to Coptic bind a chapbook. View the accompanying slideshow for information on formatting your book in Microsoft Word.